DuetsBlog Collaborations in Creativity & the Law

Striking The Pose of Differentiation?

Posted in Branding, Dilution, Famous Marks, Marketing, Sight, Trademarks

four tractors face forward

As you’ll see, I’m no equestrian (nor equine expert for that matter), but given the non-verbal logos shown above, are you able to tell what company operates a fleet of these semi tractor-trailers?

Does the color of the horse help? Horse breed? The direction it is facing? How about its pose?

Some possible considerations and the answer below the jump.

Answer: The above semi tractor-trailers are operated by Black Horse Carriers.

Here are some other possible trademarked considerations, but you’d be wrong with any of these: 

Mark Image  Mark Image

(A) Prancing Horse                              (B) Galloping to the Left Horse

Mark Image                 Mark Image

(C) Running to the Right Horse            (D) Running to the Right Horse

Mark Image                                   Mark Image

(E) Rearing to the Right Horse                  (F) Racing Forward Horse

Mark Image                          Mark Image

(G) Jumping to the Right Horse            (H) Rearing to the Right Horse

Mark Image         Mark Image

(I) Driving to the Right Horse                       (J) Rearing to the Right Horse

What does this herd say about the relative strength of white and black non-verbal horse logos?

Does their suggestiveness of power exceed the other p-word’s popularity in taglines?

Is it possible for one or more of these non-verbal logos to achieve famous status or is the field too crowded to warrant dilution protection?

Given the relatedness of the associated goods for many of these apparently peacefully coexisting non-verbal logos, one might ask how important the color, breed, direction, and pose are for purposes of differentiating them from one another?

Last, anyone know what the visual difference is between a "prancing" horse and a "rearing" one?

Other than the direction the tail is pointing, I can’t tell the difference between the "prancing" horse in (A) with the "rearing" horses in (J) or the above semi tractor-trailers. But again, I’m no equestrian.

So, consider asking Ferrari, owner of the PRANCING HORSE word-only trademark.