DuetsBlog Collaborations in Creativity & the Law

When it Comes to Guest Blogging: Fine or Just Fine?

Posted in Branding, False Advertising, Food, Guest Bloggers, Marketing, Trademarks

In many contexts of our life experience, "fine" sadly seems to have drifted toward embodying mediocrity.

Consider this all too common dialogue: "How are you?" "Oh, I’m fine."  Or, perhaps, "Just fine."

Translation: "O.K.," "average," "acceptable," "passable," "satisfactory," "I can’t complain," "I’ve been better," or maybe "could be much better" . . . .

After all, how interested or excited does someone sound with their "fine by me" response to your generous invitation or suggestion? Especially when accompanied by emoticons or real-life eye-rolling body language?

Whatever happened to the leading dictionary meanings of this orally over-used four-letter-word?:

"Of superior or best quality; of high or highest grade: fine wine."

"Choice, excellent, or admirable: a fine painting."

Outside the context of wine, art, food, china, jewelry, dining, and perhaps blogging, extolling fineness does nothing to draw me in.

Perhaps this recognition is consistent with why the term appears in less than 1,500 live marks on the USPTO database. In fact, there are more dead marks including this term than live ones. In addition, it appears less frequently in the USPTO database than other laudatory terms like "best" or "choice" — by considerable margins. And many of the live marks that do exist lead the adjective with another one (i.e., SuperFine Bakery, Veryfine Juice, or Damn Fine Tea) — futher evidence the f-word seems emotionally weak standing on its own.

I’m left wondering whether the term’s meaning decline began with Toni Basil’s "one hit wonder" from 1982 entitled "Mickey," with the ad nauseam lyrics: "Oh, Mickey you’re so fine, you’re so fine, you blow my mind, hey Mickey, hey Mickey." Just a thought.

Having said all that, I’ll have to admit, I’m still definitely a sucker for quaint red neon signs appearing in frost-paned country windows reading "Fine Dining," even when the exterior of the establishment might speak otherwise or even beg to differ. My family certainly can attest that these dining adventures have led to mixed reviews over the years.

In the distant world of comic book grading, a "fine" grade is only a 6.0 on a 10.0 scale, according to CGC. Worse yet, a "fine" designation using the Sheldon Scale of Coin Grading yields a meager 12 out of a possible 70 score.

I’d love to hear from our expert naming friends on the question of how and why the word "fine" has lost its "superior" meaning, at least in so much of our day-to-day common English usage.

Now, when it comes to the context of lawyering, "fine" can mean something much more negative than mediocre: As in, you better read the "fine print" in the contract!

References to "the fine print" also can have negative or controversial connotations in the world of advertising and marketing, as in the context of deceptive or misleading advertising.

So, in my humble effort to rejuvenate the "superior," "excellent," "highest grade," and "admirable" meanings behind the four-letter-word "fine," below the jump you’ll find twelve of my favorite and mighty fine guest posts from a diverse collection of our fine guest bloggers during 2011.

Here they are in order of appearance on DuetsBlog in 2011, not fineness, since all are even very fine:

  1. The Brand Name Auction: Bargain or Bust? (Laurel Sutton)
  2. 5 Important Questions about Super Bowl Ads (David Mitchel)
  3. "Los Doyers" Goes Legit. Are You Cheering?  (Nancy Friedman)
  4. The ‘Sheen’ is off Charlie (Randall Hull)
  5. Who Owns a Dead Brand? (John Reinan)
  6. What’s Up with Dogs? (Karl Schweikart & Susan Hopp)
  7. Congratulations on the Acquisition…Now About That Brand… (Matt Kucharski)
  8. Enforcement of U.S. Copyrights in the U.K. (Simon Bennett)
  9. Vote Jank or Swank for Better Design (Aaron Keller)
  10. Sonic Bimbo (Mark Prus)
  11. Silence Can Be Toxic – Or, Tips for Counteracting Trademark Bullies (Jim Lukaszewski)
  12. The Lifeblood of Mediocrity (Brent Carlson-Lee)

Thanks to every one of our fine guest bloggers whether listed here in this brief roundup or not!

If you’d like to share your voice as another one of our fine guest bloggers during 2012, please let us know, we’d love to hear from you.

  • Yes, so true. Language morphs and meaning deteriorates. Fine is joining the ranks of “whatever.”

  • A fine post, Stephen! Or perhaps excellent is more appropriate? Happy 2012.

  • elaine marie

    What a fine article, Stephen!

  • As an editor, I’d like to speak up in defense of fine detail and the proverbial fine-toothed comb. Happy New Year, everyone!