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NASCAR Brand Gasoline at a Pump Near You?

Posted in Advertising, Articles, Branding, Contracts, Marketing, Non-Traditional Trademarks, Sight, Smell, Taste, Trademarks, USPTO

With the Strafford Publications webinar later today discussing the Lanham Trademark Act’s “Use in Commerce” requirement, with some of my favorite panelists no less, the topic has been on my mind, even when pumping gas into my rental car in Houston, Texas, this past weekend:

NASCARGasolinePump

So, what do folks think, does this photograph of a gasoline pump constitute “use in commerce” of the NASCAR trademark and brand in connection with gasoline, classified in Int’l Class 4?

NASCAR has all sorts of stuff that can be purchased online with it’s brand name and trademark on it, but to serve a trademark function (identify, distinguish, and indicate the source of gasoline), and to demonstrate proper use in commerce of a word mark (as opposed to non-traditional subject matter like colors and scents — we’ll pass on the possibility of taste for this one though), applying the mark directly on the goods isn’t possible given the liquid state.

NASCAR also has an impressive trademark licensing program and more than a semi truckload of federal trademark and service mark registrations to protect its licensed brand, but interestingly, none presently covering Int’l Class 4 or gasoline.

It appears the closest NASCAR has come to protecting gasoline in Int’l Class 4 is through this expired NASCAR registration for motor oil and automotive greases in Int’l Class 4.

Yet, I’m thinking TMEP 904.03(c) contemplates the issue and fully supports using the above photo as an appropriate specimen to demonstrate use in commerce of the NASCAR mark for gasoline, by showing the mark directly on the containers or packaging for the goods: “gasoline pumps are normal containers or ‘packaging’ for gasoline.

Why do you suppose NASCAR hasn’t taken this step (yet)?