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Game-maker Sues Lucasfilm over Han Solo Movie

Posted in Copyrights, Infringement, Television, Trademarks

You may have heard of a little movie called Star Wars. If you haven’t, well, I’ve got some movies for you to borrow. The film was released in 1977, and soon spawned a trilogy of movies that are among the most popular film franchises in the world. Fast forward forty years and eight of the nine triple-trilogy movies have been released, along with spin off movies such as Rogue One and the soon-to-be released Solo. However, the new Solo movie has created a spin-off of its own: a lawsuit filed by a U.K. gamemaker claiming that Lucasfilm’s movie and subsequent advertising infringes on his trademark rights in the mark SABACC.

The complaint was filed by Ren Ventures (“RV”) and its licensee Sabacc Creative Industries and the main issue involved is which party owns rights in the SABACC name and trademark. From the best I can tell, the name Sabacc was coined by George Lucas (the creator of Star Wars) or one of his co-writers at Lucasfilm. The game is mentioned in the original 1977 Star Wars movie and is referenced throughout the Star Wars universe of books and movies. For example, Han Solo “famously” won his spaceship the Millennium Falcon in a Sabacc game. That story likely plays out in the plot of the new Solo movie, which likely explains why Sabacc is prominently featured in advertising related to the movie, like this Denny’s commercial.

But does Lucasfilm’s use of SABACC as a fictional card game in movies and books create enforceable trademark rights? I haven’t seen any current use of SABACC with any specific goods or services, so there doesn’t appear to be any traditional trademark usage (affixed to goods or their packaging). However, Lucasfilms has sought and obtained registration for a number of similar features of the Star Wars universe, as you may recall from this Handy List of Star Wars References that Might Get You Sued. These registered marks include LIGHTSABER, THE FORCE, JEDI, and others. Of course, these marks are used with toys and other merchandise, making Lucasfilm’s claim to trademark rights a bit easier.

In fact, Lucasfilms distributed a licensed Sabacc card game in 1989. An image of the rules are below, but it appears this was a limited distribution.

Given that SABACC is a term coined by Lucasfilm and used only in the Star Wars universe, what type of Jedi mind tricks is RV using to assert its own rights in the SABACC name? Surprisingly, they’re relying on some ancient dark magic – a trademark registration. According to the complaint, RV sought to adopt a trademark for a game that mixed the rules of poker and blackjack. The complaint alleges that RV “searched the public domain for names” for such games, and the search revealed the names Pojack, 727, 727 Poker, Home Card, and Sabaac (ed note: one of these names is not like the other…). It’s unclear what RV meant by searching the “public domain,” as that phrase is normally used for copyright protected works that have lost their protection. Nonetheless, RV filed an application to register the SABACC mark for various computer game software and entertainment services. The application was published for opposition on June 7, 2016 and, after no third-party opposed, a registration issued on Aug. 23, 2016.

Although Lucasfilm actively enforces its rights at the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, likely with the assistance of numerous watch services, its hard to fault Lucasfilm for not opposing. After all, even with all that Disney money, it might be difficult to justify a watch notice for each every made up element from the Star Wars universe. Regardless, Lucasfilm eventually learned of the registration and filed a Petition for Cancellation on May 1, 2017 with the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board (“TTAB”). Lucasfilm filed a Motion for Summary Judgment and, shortly thereafter, RV filed an infringement action and requested suspension of the cancellation proceeding at the TTAB.

RV has begun use of the SABACC game to promote online games, including at the iTunes store. A screenshot of the store is shown below:

You’ll notice that there are a number of word choices in the description that reference the Star Wars universe. This includes the reference to a “Cantina” (the Mos Eisley Cantina plays a major role in the original Star Wars movie), the word “galaxy” and the phrase “far, far away” (A reference to the films’ opening credits), and a reference to Cloud City, which plays a major role in the Empire Strikes Back. The use of a single one of these might not be concerning, but all of them in combination with Sabacc? Coincidence, I’m sure…

Setting aside Lucasfilm’s potential claims for trademark and copyright infringement, the facts strongly suggest that Luasfilm has a claim of unfair competition against RV. Based on all of these “coincidences,” the facts strongly suggest RV is attempting to capitalize on the goodwill and popularity of Star Wars. RV has essentially created the exact same game from the movies and books, is promoting the game utilizing similar imagery of robots, and utilizing words and phrasing uniquely associated with the Star Wars franchise to promote the game.

RV seems to be placing all of its eggs in the basket of “Lucasfilm didn’t use the mark in commerce and therefore we established valid trademark rights.” Unfortunately, there is at least one allegation in RV’s complaint that they might break a few of those eggs:

when consumers encounter Plaintiff’s pre-existing SABACC brand video playing-card game in the marketplace, they are likely to mistakenly believe that Defendants are the source of, and/or sponsor or endorse, Plaintiff’s SABACC brand video playing-card game, and/or that Defendants, the upcoming Solo Film, and/or Defendants’ Hand of Sabacc Commercial is/are otherwise associated or connected with Plaintiffs, Plaintiff RV’s SABACC Mark, and/or Plaintiff SCI’s pre-existing SABACC brand video playing-card game

The allegation arguably eliminates any need for Lucasfilm to establish use in commerce of the SABACC mark. The allegation suggests that the mere use of playing a Sabacc game in the movie or a in a commercial creates a likelihood of confusion with RV’s video game. If that’s all that it takes to create a likelihood of confusion, it makes it pretty easy for Lucasfilm to agree and simply gather the evidence of Lucasfilm’s use of Sabacc games in its films, moves, books, and related merchandise since 1977, and assert its counterclaim for infringement based on these prior rights.

With an upcoming premiere date of May 15 at the Cannes Film Festival, and a U.S. release date of May 25, there isn’t much time for the parties to work out a settlement. I’m not one with the Force and certainly can’t read minds, but I have a feeling this lawsuit won’t change Lucasfilm’s timeline.