No spoilers here, I promise.  Like many Americans since it was released on Friday, I’ve been binge-watching Season 3 of House of Cards.  If you haven’t watched the program, available only on Netflix, it’s a riveting drama of political intrigue with stellar acting featuring Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright.  The promise of another House of

– Chuck Sanchez, BatesMeron Sweet Design 

Comcast. Electronic Arts. AT&T. Walmart. Dell. Time Warner. Fox News. McDonald’s.

Chances are, at least one of those company names kind of pissed you off just now.

Despite this likelihood, each of these brands is immediately recognizable due to widespread financial success in its respective industry. So must a

—Joy Newborg, Winthrop & Weinstine, P.A.

As Election Day, November 2nd,  is fast approaching, I thought it would be timely to do a piece on politicians and how they periodically run afoul of the copyright laws.

Over the past few years, there have been several political candidates accused of using copyrighted material in

twitterrificDownload-Spam Logo-

What does Twitter have in common with Kool-Aid, Mickey Mouse, and Spam? Maybe nothing, at least yet, but I predict that it will soon, unless Twitter retains some talented PR help in a hurry. Why?

The Kool-Aid, Mickey Mouse, and Spam brands all have spawned secondary or alternate and negative non-trademark meanings that have become part of the English language, meanings in each case that lack positive brand associations, to say the least. If Twitter is not careful it will find itself “following” the likes of Kool-Aid, Mickey Mouse, and Spam, and be in the similar undesirable position of tolerating language changes that distract from their brands and favorable brand messages, to be left watching others make generic use of their brand names to communicate a variety of ideas and meanings that are neither flattering nor brand building.


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