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Tag Archives: Lingering Goodwill

Talk to Chuck, Trade Like Chuck, or Chuckit?

Posted in Advertising, Articles, Branding, Loss of Rights, Marketing, Television, Trademarks, Truncation, USPTO

A recent advertisement caught my ear because it involved financial services offered by a guy named Charles Hughes a/k/a Chuck Hughes and the catchy marketing phrase Trade Like Chuck: It instantly reminded me of a piece I wrote in 2010 called: Exposing Two-Face Brands. One of the branding truncation examples I wrote about there noted… Continue Reading

GM’s Chevy Trademark Dodges Fatal Lyrics: “This’ll Be The Day That I Die”

Posted in Branding, Famous Marks, Goodwill, Loss of Rights, Marketing, Trademarks

My trademark antennas automatically rise when I hear about a brand owner announcing plans to trade in one brand for another, as GM recently and surprisingly did with the Chevy nickname (brand and trademark), in favor of the longer and more formal Chevrolet brand name (and trademark). Hat tip to Nils Montan of IPAlly, for spotting GM’s Chevy veering… Continue Reading

Using Another’s Body to Sell Your Products? The Problem of Airbrushing Non-Traditional Trademarks

Posted in Advertising, Branding, Food, Goodwill, Infringement, Loss of Rights, Marketing, Non-Traditional Trademarks, Product Configurations, Product Packaging, Sight, Trademarks

  Airbrushing is a familiar technique among advertisers looking to avoid the risk of trademark infringement or dilution liability when branded props of others appear and would otherwise be recognizable. It can work well when removing a traditional visual trademark, i.e., a logo or word mark, because there can be no likelihood of confusion with (or dilution of) a visual… Continue Reading