Las Vegas has a welcoming brand, probably best known by the nearly decade old famous and iconic slogan: What Happens in Vegas Stays in Vegas.

LVCVA owns it for gaming machines, slot machine services, and “promoting the Las Vegas, Nevada area as a destination for leisure and business travelers.”

If you’re not aware of the origin and the connection to Minnesota, here you go.

Las Vegas has welcomed the SHOT Show for many years, so here we are, once again, connecting with our many brand-toting friends in the industry.

Although I haven’t yet noticed evidence of it on the streets or the strip, the famous WHIVSIV slogan is reportedly back from its brief hiatus.

MGM Resorts’ Aria appears to be building on the meaning of Vegas with a fairly new slogan of its own that interestingly employs the term being used as a verb:

Given all the other places we’ve seen and reported on brandverbing to date, and now that we know it happens in Vegas too, only time will tell if it stays in Vegas:

As you know, we have welcomed the challenge by marketing types to press the edges and not fall into the assumed knee-jerk legal trap when it comes to weighing the true risks of genericide based on the verbing of brands, but if you’re not Google, this recommended reading from our archives — on the subject of trademark verbing and the risk of genericide, is still highly useful:

Who will be the next to jump on the brandverbing bandwagon? How long will the ride last?

All that said, Aria’s This is How We Vegas, should not be confused with This is How We Hotel, much less, This is How I Vegas, for sure, or even this one either:

 

It all started here, nearly ten years ago now, with our inaugural DuetsBlog post called Dr. No and the Parade of Horribles. We used a Seth Godin post called Looking for Yes as our launchpad.

The rest is history. Seth revealed himself a fan of the blog on our 4th birthday, what a surprise. He generously has engaged with us since then, weighing in on topics ranging from branding to trademark bullying to Velcro’s fear of trademark genericide, with so much more in between.

Recently, Seth generously agreed to answer the 12 questions below. What should we ask next?

Continue Reading Seth Godin Answers 12 DuetsBlog Questions

As the drum beat grows for our interview of Seth Godin tomorrow, it is only fitting that we are reminded of the importance of embracing tension and the ruckus we’ve set out to make here.

Seth’s fabulous and penetrating new book called This is Marketing, will be released tomorrow, no doubt another best-seller, a must-read for any lawyer who cares to make change for the better.

Until then, thanks again to Fred McGrath for this second video, capturing how we embrace tension:

Welcome to another edition of trademark stories that are inspired by billboard advertisements:

This one was captured for obvious reasons, if you’re familiar with our interest in brandverbing:

Putting aside whether early October is too early to be promoting holiday wine shopping without a hint of a Halloween theme (there’s Stellaween for that), thoughts about the Stellabrate verbing?

Does Stellabrate make you want to throw a party? Hamm it up? Tanqueray? Or, count bottles?

Stella Rosa (Star Rose) has poured itself an overflowing glass of Stella-trademarks (Stellabrate, StellabrationStellaweenStella Peach, Stella Berry, Stella RedStella Pink, Stella Gold, Stella PlatinumStella BiancoStella Babies, Stella Moscato, Stella Rosso, Stella Rose, It’s Stella Time, and Stella Gets Around), but it does not own the six-letter, one-word, star of the trademark show:

If the actual Stella trademark was in Stella Rosa’s constellation of trademark rights, it likely wouldn’t need to be coexisting or peacefully orbiting with the likes of these other wine “star” marks: StellaGrey, Stella Bella, Stella MaePoggio Stella, AquaStella, and Buona Stella.

While Stella Rosa can continue to brandverb with Stellabrate, and grow its constellation of Stella-trademarks, without Stella, becoming a really bright trademark star isn’t likely in this wine galaxy.

Much less in a beer garden:

It’s been a little while since the last example we’ve shared showing a brand turning its face, or a blind eye, on age-old rigid trademark advice, counseling against using a brand name as a verb.

Given the more common trend of many alcoholic beverage brands focusing attention and their messaging on drinking responsibly, MillerCoors has made a surprising choice with Hamm It Up!

While we’re all for encouraging brand owners to carefully explore the true risk of genericide from verbing their brand name, encouraging drinkers to be “ridiculous or over the top,” is over the top.

We get it, Hamm’s is going gangbusters as an economy beer brand, but there is a way to verb an alcohol brand more gracefully, so I’m left wondering when MillerCoors will, let’s say, Hang it Up?

UPDATE: In case you’re wondering, the microscopic text in the lower right corner of the billboard reads like a disclaimer: “ENJOY IN MODERATION.” How’s that for a messaging mixed drink?

Yes and no are at opposite ends of the spectrum. North Pole, South Pole. Night and day. Win, loss. Black, white. Available, unavailable. Protectable, unprotectable. Infringing, non-infringing. They represent a binary proposition, like a traditional light switch with two settings: on and off.

My daughter loves the yes end of the spectrum; no, not so much; and maybe is tolerable, because it’s easy to get hopes up and accelerate to hearing yes. The problem is the large chasm between maybe and either end of the yes/no spectrum. Maybe can be uncertain and confusing.

Maybe spans a great distance between yes and no. Maybe can mean a slight possibility, or it can also mean a strong probability — creating a vast range of very different options that can be rather unhelpful to those who are paying for legal advice to make smart business decisions.

As we have written before, marketing types understandably love to hear yes too, when they seek legal advice about trademarks, and they are ever more prepared to probe, question, and challenge advice when they hear no, by way of example, remember the brandverbing trend?

Although we launched this blog seven years ago from the springboard of distancing ourselves from Dr. No and his Parade of Horribles, it is also worth noting, lawyers are frequently criticized for not giving a straight answer because, after all, it depends! Sounds like maybe, right?

For those of you who may not have been engaged here for our inaugural Dr. No blog post, might you remember J.D. Waffler: The Art of Taking a Position? If not, maybe you should check it out?

Over the weekend, we didn’t just have our seventh birthday, our friend Seth Godin artfully wrote again (like clockwork) about “Saying No,” and with the passing of former First Lady Nancy Reagan, we were all reminded of the simplicity of her famous “Just Say No” anti-drug campaign.

So, I’m left wondering if the historically rigid trademark advice against verbing and other concepts sounded in no as a way of keeping the advice simple to avoid client confusion and potential adverse outcomes, no matter how remote? Perhaps a strong candidate for a maybe?

It seems to me the key to successful relationships with trademark types is being able to enjoy the benefit of their experience, clear communication, and trust, and knowing that getting to yes is often possible and worthwhile, but not always the easiest or most direct path from maybe.

And, just maybe, your favorite trademark type can help remove for you the confusing and uncertain nature of the it depends and the maybes of trademark life.

uberUber, the popular brand that helps people arrange prompt ground transportation, is now also being called a verb. The Star Tribune recently reported that the founder of iHail, a recent competitor of Uber in the Twin Cities market, would like to achieve the same anointed status: “I want iHail to become a verb, just like Uber.” So, let’s say trademark types might be cringing.

Let me know if you’re still cringing after reviewing these gems from the archives on the risk of trademark genericide through trademark verbing:

Hat tip to Joel Leviton, who by the way did a very nice job earlier today presenting “Key IP Issues in Advertising Law” at the Minnesota IP Institute in downtown Minneapolis.

My question, has Uber become the brandverb über alles? (the link exists for those of you who didn’t get the pun in the title of my post or take German in high-school)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diageo, the Tanqueray brand owner is currently running billboard ads in the Twin Cities as part of its “Tonight We Tanqueray” ad campaign. A couple of years back when the campaign first was announced, Diageo explained it this way:

“One of the world’s most awarded gins, Tanqueray London Dry has just launched a substantial new global campaign ‘Tonight we Tanqueray’, positioning Tanqueray as the drink to set the tone to an evening, inviting consumers to start the night right.”

Did you notice the verbing of the Tanqueray brand and trademark? Nancy Friedman over at Fritinancy did last year. As risky as verbing can be for some brands, as we previously have discussed extensively here, here, here, here, and here, Diageo appears to have gotten this one right, making a number of choices consistent with our earlier checklist for mitigating the risk of genericide and avoiding a complete loss of trademark rights.

Diageo obtained federal registrations for TONIGHT WE TANQUERAY and the stylized version depicted in the ads shown above, two years ago. And, it appears another Tanqueray verbing tagline was federally-registered six years ago for READY TO TANQUERAY? — but unless a Section 8 & 15 Declaration is filed during the currently open grace period, it will die a natural death.

One of the non-legal consequences of using TANQUERAY as a verb in these taglines is that consumers naturally will fill in the blank on what the brand means to them so that they can ascribe meaning to the tagline. I suppose this invitation for engagement could be good or bad, depending on how the brand is perceived. Given the title of this blog post, I have filled in the blank for TANQUERAY to be synonymous with TOAST or CELEBRATE. What does the brand mean to you?

The ads shown above also depict something else we have written extensively about here: non-traditional trademarks. Note the classy and unspoken “look-for advertising” to promote the Tanqueray green/red color trade dress and bottle configuration (both federally-registered decades ago).

Last, for the history buffs out there, note the wonderful archive of product labels that can be obtained from the online records at the USPTO, here the front and back of a nearly century old product label for TANQUERAY gin, showing the USPTO’s mail room stamp from 1917:

Until seeing this specimen I hadn’t appreciated Tanqueray is the surname of the brand’s founder Charles Tanqueray.

It must be a very rare surname as the Diageo marks are the only ones in the entire USPTO database containing the term TANQUERAY. And, none of the registrations rely on Section 2(f) of Lanham Act for purposes of distinctiveness.

Have you ever met someone named Tanqueray?

 

Thumbnail for version as of 15:21, 6 September 2009           Thumbnail for version as of 14:28, 28 October 2007  Thumbnail for version as of 05:55, 3 December 2007

More than a few trademark types cringe when their clients or others say things like "let’s trademark it," "they didn’t trademark their logo," or "we don’t want to trademark this name," and, when they ask questions like "is it trademarked?" or "is that trademarked software?" or "did we ever trademark our logo?" or "should we be trademarking this packaging?"

Indeed, some have written: “’Trademark’ is not a verb. There is no such thing as ‘trademarking’ a word or phrase." Similar views are expressed here, here, and here.

Perhaps any cringing may result from the fact that the Lanham Act — the federal trademark statute — defines the word "trademark" as a noun, not a verb or adjective:

The term "trademark" includes any word, name, symbol, or device, or any combination thereof —

(1) used by a person, or

(2) which a person has a bona fide intention to use in commerce and applies to register on the principal register established by this chapter,

to identify and distinguish his or her goods, including a unique product, from those manufactured or sold by others and to indicate the source of the goods, even if that source is unknown.

Section 45 of Lanham Act, 15 U.S.C. 1127.

Turns out though, the words "trademark," "trademarked," and "trademarking," are recognized words with established verb meanings that have formed part of the English language: "(1) To label (a product) with proprietary identification; and (2) to register (something) as a trademark." Moreover, the word "trademarked" has an established adjective meaning too: "labeled with proprietary (and legally registered) identification guaranteeing exclusive use; ‘trademarked goods’".

From my perspective, there is no need for cringing or even correction, just further inquiry into how the words "trademark," "trademarked," and "trademarking" are being used.

Continue Reading What Does “Trademarked” Mean to You?