As I mentioned last week, Apple’s present iPhone Xs billboard advertising campaign is ubiquitous at the moment, especially this image, totally flooding the Minneapolis skyway system, and beyond:

Putting aside whether the unique lighting and reflective nature of the indoor billboards do justice to the art of the iPhone Xs ad, I’m also questioning whether the Xs repetition might be, excessive?

See what I mean? Above and especially below, with stretches of hundreds of feet — in the frozen tundra of our Minneapolis skyway,  nothing in sight, but the same, glaring and reflective Xs ad:

A few questions come to mind. Repetition in branding, yes it’s important, but are there no limits?

In other words, we know Apple can afford to dominate our skyway billboard space, but should it?

And, if so, with what? Apple’s user-generated content campaign was welcome, brilliant and unique.

But, what is the end goal of covering the Minneapolis skyway, with a train of identical Xs boxcars?

Isn’t the art of the ad lost when it is the only thing in front of you, or should I say Outfront of you?

A boring train of Xs boxcar ads builds no momentum to a destination, like Wall Drug ads on I-90.

Where is this train of repetitive ads supposed to take us, online to drive more holiday unit sales?

That seems doubtful, the ad doesn’t explain why one should replace an earlier version with the Xs.

Ironically, Apple’s current struggle is distancing itself from the stock market’s focus on unit sales.

Billboard advertising is said to be effective for brand awareness, but Apple hardly struggles there.

I’m not seeing the point of this ad, and repetition won’t solve the problem of a saturated market.

I’m just left feeling like I paid too much for my Xs, because Apple wasted too much on these ads.

Aren’t digital advertising billboards amazing? My iPhone captured this rolling series of images just yesterday, for a health care organization using the Google trademark in the Minneapolis skyway:

My questions, permission, co-branding, no permission, but classic or nominative fair use?

Is Google flattered? Free advertising? Do they care? Should they care?

Discuss, to quote John Welch, on another subject.

 

The above advertising billboard is plastered all over the Twin Cities at the moment, and it got me thinking, so here I am, once again, writing about Coke Zero, remember this can?

Coke obtained a favorable decision from the TTAB early last year, ruling that ZERO is not generic for a soft drink category, instead it is descriptive and Coke has secondary meaning in it.

So, why on earth has Coke positioned SUGAR immediately next to the word ZERO beneath the Coca-Cola script in widespread billboard advertising and packaging?

Putting the key trademark issue aside, it doesn’t even look like there is a good business case for it?

Had the above billboard advertisement and depicted bottle been part of the TTAB case decided last year, instead of specimens like the above can, seems probable we’d have seen a different result.

Has Coke forgotten that like functionality for non-traditional trademarks, genericness can be raised as a validity challenge for word marks, at any time?

Coke Zero, welcome to the Genericide Watch.

By now, you’re familiar with my enjoyment in capturing and sharing new billboard signage that hits the streets of the Twin Cities. Question, what tagline might have inspired this one?

Was the Minnesota Renaissance Festival inspired by Nike’s famous “Just Do It” tagline?

Almost four years ago now, we noted — in this gem from the archives — the following about Nike’s famous “battle cry” tagline when we discussed “Just Ship It” reluctance with Seth:

“The irony in Nike’s ‘battle cry’ tagline is that its trademark enforcement program for the ‘Just Do It’ tagline and mark is not a model of clarity or simplicity, much less one easily understood by those paid to advise clients about the risks of potentially conflicting trademark rights.”

We further noted that Nike had only filed two oppositions with the TTAB enforcing its “Just Do It” tagline since Nike’s previous resounding TTAB win against Just Jesu It back in 2011.

Since that October 22, 2013 blog post gem, Nike appears to have stepped up enforcement activities at the TTAB, filing twenty “Just Do It” oppositions at the TTAB, with all concluded proceedings showing victory for Nike:

  1. Just Fake It for clothing;
  2. Just Mak’in It for clothing;
  3. Just Fix It for golf equipment;
  4. Just Chew It for chewing gum;
  5. Frac-N-Hose Just Frac It & Design for clothing;
  6. Life Just Live It for clothing (opposition withdrawn after “Just” removed from applied-for-mark);
  7. Just Did It for clothing (Board granted opposition, sustaining likelihood of confusion and dilution by blurring grounds);
  8. Just Choose It for clothing;
  9. Just Weld It! for clothing;
  10. Just Be It! for clothing;
  11. Just D!dIt & Design for online marketplace services;
  12. Just Taste It! for dietary supplements (still pending);
  13. Just Beer It! for clothing;
  14. Just Ripp It for clothing;
  15. Just Dough It for cookie dough;
  16. Just Girl It! for group coaching services;
  17. Just Bring It for clothing (WWE withdrew application with prejudice);
  18. Just Taste It for advertising services (still pending);
  19. JustSayIt for books and ebooks concerning positive oral communication (still pending); and
  20. JUSTKIT for clothing(still pending).

This recent timeline of oppositions seems to show more clearly that third party trademark applications employing the “Just __ It” format will draw attention/opposition from Nike.

Interestingly, since it doesn’t appear that the Minnesota Renaissance Festival is seeking federal registration, we might never know whether Nike objects to the use shown above.

Instead of tweaking the middle term of Nike’s tagline — “Do” — as all of the oppositions above show, the Renaissance Festival’s format plays on the leading word “Just,” substituting “Joust,” a term with special meaning in the context and theme of its festival.

Is this a material difference that justifies peaceful coexistence, or is it simply a new form of “battle cry” that similarly will be linked to Nike?

If you were advising Nike, would you recommend activating a trademark “battle cry” against use of “Joust Do It!” in the above billboard advertisement?

What if this tagline became an annual tradition for promoting the Renaissance Festival’s entertainment services?

What if a federal trademark or service mark application was filed?

Finally, what if the tagline was applied to clothing to promote the Renaissance Festival?

CaptainPhilipRapalaIt took me a little while to find the message and humor in this one. I’m generally not the first to get the joke, probably dead last on this one though, since the fishing opener was last month.

As you know, we have enjoyed commenting on Rapala’s billboard ads each year, but when I first saw this one, I figured it must relate to some inside joke about a certain film I never saw.

How much do you like this Rapala Billboard ad?

I’ll ask a larger question too, how do marketing types go about predicting ad effectiveness when the embedded and intended humor is not immediately accessible to all potential consumers?

It has been a while since a billboard campaign has caught my interest and attention, but the currently running Absolut Goes Dark ads are an exception worth noting:

AbsolutJack

AbsolutJohnnie

AbsolutJim

Isn’t it interesting — at least in this context — how the simple references to Jack, Johnnie, and Jim, draw an obvious comparison to the distilled spirits brands Jack Daniels, Johnnie Walker, and Jim Beam? We’ve discussed here before similar fair comparative advertisements — in the context of Vodka brands no less — and brand leader references.

Although the JIM BEAM brand has been federally-registered a very long time, it doesn’t appear the brand has sought protection for the truncated version of its name, JIM.

Same story with JOHNNIE, but not so with Mr. Daniel — he seems to know more than Jack about protecting trademark truncations, having obtained a federal registration for JACK standing alone, more than a decade ago, and he recently used this specimen to keep it active:

JackAd

Swedish Absolut is not only on a first name basis with these well-known distilled spirit brands, but it also appears to know how to own federally-registered rights in the shape of its bottle:

AbsolutBottleNow, if Absolut were to truncate its name, should it target a low calorie version that allows drinkers to target their Abs? Look what one finds when searching for Abs Vodka . . . .